Twin Comforter Blanket Tutorial

November 5, 2013 in Projects

Several months ago, when I was pregnant with my son and we were moving my 2 year old to a big girl bed, I just wanted to purchase a bedroom set for her. After relentlessly searching for the bedroom set that was absolutely adorable for the right price, we found what we loved and purchased it from a fairly nice store with a coupon…it still wasn’t cheap. Unfortunately, after just a couple months, some of the ruffles started to fray in several spots. It also turns out that the fabric, itself, was pretty cheap and flimsy. What irritated me the most was that I could have made something for her! I was just trying to save time. It frustrated me so much…I decided to scrap it and just sew something already! I went with the same color scheme and am loving it. The best part…I know it’s made well with quality fabric! ๐Ÿ™‚ So, let’s begin! (Also, coming soon, shown below is a sneak peak at the bed skirt)!

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

This tutorial is for the Twin Comforter Blanket (click here for the pillowcase or click here for the valance…more to come: Pillow Sham, Decorative Pillows, Ruffled Bed Skirt). For my comforter, I had my quilt top and a plush cuddle fabric backing and did not include a batting (but, you can always follow the instructions below to make the quilt top and then, back and bat it)

Supplies:

4 fabrics: 2 yards each (from 45″ wide fabric)

Backing: If you get 60″, get 4.5 yards (I got soft Cuddle fabric; this may vary if you get a different backing)

Polyester All Purpose Thread

Your Sewing Machine

And, as always, I give alternatives to these methods, but,

If you would like to add ruffles (see steps 4-9), a Ruffling Foot is highly recommended

ย A sewing machine rolled hem foot or a Serger that can Roll Hem (this is what I used) is very helpful as well

Instructions:

1. Let’s cut our fabric. We’ll be cutting strips from the lengthwise grain, which is parallel to the selvage, your manufactured finish (also, take note: my Fabric B is stripes and I wanted the strips to lay vertically on the blanket, so, I had to cut strips perpendicular to the lengthwise grain and piece them together).

Fabric A is the first row on the comforter (my green fabric) and is cut at 4″ wide by 66″ long.

Fabric B is the second row on the comforter (my strip fabric) and is cut at 6″ wide by 66″ long (after sewing 2 together and cutting down to 66″ because of the way the stripes were on the fabric).

Fabric C is the third row (my pink fabric) and is cut at 9″ wide by 66″ long (I also cut ruffling strips from this fabric…it’s a tight fit because the width is so wide to get ruffling strips out of it…so, be conservative with your cutting if you will be adding ruffles (like cut as close to the selvage as possible).

Fabric D is the fourth row (my butterfly fabric) and is cut at 7.5″ wide by 66″ long.

We need 4 strips from Fabric A, B, and C and 3 strips from D. Then, if you will be adding ruffles, cut, 1.5″ strips as long as you can get them; you’ll need 3 strips from Fabric A, C, and D. Note: If you are using a sewing machine hemmer foot, you may want to cut your ruffle strips at 2″ wide.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

2. To sew the comforter together. Sew a Fabric A strip to a Fabric B Strip. Place pretty sides together and stitch a 1/2″ seam allowance. Then, add a Fabric C strip to B. Then, add a Fabric D strip to C. Only sew 4 strips together, then the next 4 strips together, then the next 4 strips together, and finally, 3 strips together (ending with Fabric C).

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

3. Iron your seam allowances in one direction.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

4. If you are not adding ruffles, sew your 4 panels together. If you are adding ruffles, follow the next several steps. Sew 3 ruffle strips together to create really long strips (approx. 6 yards long).

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

5. Then, pink or serge the seam allowances.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

6. Then, to finish the long edge of your ruffles, roll hem the full length of both sides (top and bottom of your strips). You can use a sewing machine with a rolled hem foot (here’s a tutorial for the sewing machine rolled hem foot, but only iron in a 1/4″ (unless you cut your ruffle strips at 2″ wide, then iron in 3/8″) or my personal favorite, 3 thread narrow roll hem with the serger (I used an off-white thread to finish off my edges as shown below). The serger is certainly the quickest method.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

7. I, then, laid out my panels and laid my ruffle strips down to see where I wanted to place them. I placed Fabric A ruffle on the third seam, Fabric D ruffle on the 6th seam, and Fabric C ruffle on the 8th. I liked the way that the colors looked there. At this point, you can either sew the entire quilt top together, as shown below Fabric A ruffle was sewn onto the third seam, so, the quilt top didn’t need to be assembled completely (same with the second ruffle with Fabric D being sewn to the 6th seam; Fabric C ruffle, however, that quilt seam needed to be sewn before the ruffle could be stitched down).

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

8. Then, I used the ruffling foot to ruffle and stitch my ruffle down simultaneously. However, to say that was easy wouldn’t be telling the truth (only because we are dealing with a large quilt top and trying to stitch the ruffle to a straight seam…there are other instances where this is a fun and easy method). So, my recommendation would be to use the ruffling foot to ruffle your strips of fabric (ruffling foot settings: every 1 stitch at a 1-4 depth using a 2.5 stitch length), then, simply machine stitching those ruffled strips to the select seams. Or, if you do not have a ruffling foot, gather with only 1 basting stitch thread (but, be gentle when pulling to gather), even your gathers and stitch your gathered ruffle to the select seams. To stitch it down, I drew a line (with disappearing ink) 1/2″ up from the seam to guide the top of my ruffle (the reason mine is not gathered below is because I simultaneously gathered and stitched it down at the same time as discussed above…again, my recommendation, ruffle your strips first, then, sew down!.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

9. The next pictures just show my fabric for my ruffle being lined up; I even drew a line on the foot to guide my flat fabric

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Love how these turned out!!

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

10. I then, folded all my corners together ย of my comforter top and cut a curve on them (not completely necessary, but, I like the look. I just used a cup and traced, then, cut through all 4 corners with pinking sheers. You may also notice I serged my seams and around the entire quilt (this is just personal preference and does not need to be done…I just like working with fabric that doesn’t keep fraying). ๐Ÿ™‚

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

11. Then, cut your backing fabric very carefully into 2.25 yards each. To create a large backing piece, stitch a seam down the middle (horizontally). Note: Cuddle Fabric does have a nap, so, make sure that the grain will be going the same way after sewing and opened up. My little helper thought snow angels on the cuddle fabric would be fun ๐Ÿ™‚

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

12. Spread your backing out nice and even. Try not to stretch it!

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

13. Place your quilt top face down, pretty sides together on your backing and pin around the entire outer edge. I cut off large amounts of excess, but, I still left some excess backing extended from my quilt top (it can be cut close after sewing).

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

14. Stitch around the entire outer edge using a 1/2″ seam allowance and also leaving a 15″ opening on the lower edge (to allow for the entire comforter to pass through when turned right side out). After stitching, you may cut all excess down (or I used a 4 thread overlock stitch with my serger around the entire edge as it eliminates bulk). I also did not cut the excess at the opening completely; I left about 1″ of backing excess at the 15″ opening (Cuddle fabric likes to move so I wanted to make sure I had plenty when folding and stitching closed).

15. Pull everything through your opening.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

16. Pressing it along the entire outer edge is a chore, but it does help when topstitching in the next step. You can also just pin around the entire edge (but, I will say, the edge that I pressed, sewed the easiest). Pin the opening closed as shown below (folding in the seam as if there is no opening there). Pressing, then, pinning the entire outer edge is recommended.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

17. Now, topstitch around the entire outer edge of the comforter about 1/4″ to 3/8″ from the outer edge ensuring that the backing stays wrapped underneath the blanket.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

18. Finally, lay your comforter out flat (this may take some time to get it nice) pin several seams (pinning through your backing as well) and topstitch along them to keep your layers together. Stitch as many seams to preference. Important: make sure your backing is staying with your top and not warping or bunching. I think I pinned and stitched (or quilted) 5 seams.

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

Place on bed and marvel at what you just made! Let me know if you have any question; kindly leave them in the comments section! ๐Ÿ™‚

Totally Stitchin': Twin Comforter Tutorial

2 responses to Twin Comforter Blanket Tutorial

  1. I think you did a wonderful job on your daughter’s new Big Girl bed set! Was happy to see the matching window valance also looks very nice and I know she is very proud you made her room so special! By the way I have five granddaughter (20, 19, 13, 10. 10) and three grown sons. <3 <3

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