How to use the Blind Hem Foot

August 29, 2012 in Projects

The blind hem foot can help produce nice blind hems quickly with some practice! If you are using a Baby Lock Sewing Machine, then, you will use foot R. You also need to locate the blind hem stitch on your sewing machine and set your machine to that (I personally like to up my stitch length to 2.5 and then, I adjust stitch width with the thickness of the fabric…for thicker fabrics keep it at 0 or 1, with thinner fabrics move the width to 2 or 3 (sometimes I take a few stitches and then check it)). So, first, you’ll cut of the amount needed if necessary and serge or press in your raw edge (I cut off, serged, and pressed up my hem allowance as shown below). Then, pin the hem in place.

┬áThe pants should be inside out. Now, pinch the top of the hem allowance, along with the fabric underneath and turn the hem allowance into the leg of the pants…

Here the top of the hem allowance is just sticking out from being folded into the leg…

Another picture…

What looking into the leg of the pants with the hem allowance folded into the leg looks like…

Now, you’ll want about 1/4″ to 3/8″ hem allowance to stick out while sewing because the way that the blind hem stitch works is it stitches a straight stitch onto the hem allowance sticking out and then zig-zags over to catch a tiny bit of the pant repeatedly to where it holds the hem up with minimal exposure on the outside.

Line up the folded edge with the divider of the blind hem foot. Make sure your blind hem stitch is set (again, I like to set my stitch length to 2.5 and set the stitch width with how thick the fabric is (0-1 for thicker fabric, 2-3 for thinner fabric).

Before completing the whole leg, maybe stitch a little and check it to make sure that it’s not showing a lot on the outside but also, that it’s catching. Stitch all the way around; make sure when you backstitch that you’re backstitching on the hem allowance not the folded portion on the left.

The next 2 pictures show how it should look after stitching…

Here is the hemmed turned back outward…

Here’s a close up…you should barely see the stitches if at all when finished. Practice, practice, practice! And if you prefer, you could always invest in Baby Lock‘s Blind Hemming Machine! :)

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